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Student Success - Success of Developmental Students in Gateway Courses

 

Success of Developmental Students in Gateway Math measures students who successfully completed developmental math in the given fall semester and subsequently successfully completed college-level math before the end of the following fall semester, earning a grade of C or higher. Due to smaller numbers of students taking developmental math in recent years, the number of students included in this cohort has dropped from 286 students for the fall 2011 cohort to 105 students in the fall 2015 cohort. Despite these decreases, Harper’s success rate was relatively stable over time, and the fall 2015 success rate of 72.38% achieved the 2016 target.

2016 Target: Expected = 70.0-71.0%

This target was corrected when the refocused IEMs were adopted in FY2015. The expected target of 70.0-71.0% reflects the average success rates of the corrected 2006 through 2010 data.

Percent of students who successfully completed developmental math in the given fall semester and subsequently successfully completed college-level math before the end of the following fall semester, earning a grade of C or higher. Fall 2015 data represents students who successfully completed developmental math in fall 2015 and went on to successfully complete college-level math by fall 2016.

 

Success of Developmental Students in Gateway English measures students who successfully completed developmental English in the given fall semester and subsequently successfully completed college-level English course before the end of the following fall semester. Due to smaller numbers of students taking developmental reading and writing in recent years, the number of students included in this cohort has dropped from 192 students in the fall 2011 cohort to 76 students in the fall 2015 cohort. Smaller numbers of students can lead to increased variability in results from year to year, and the success rate for gateway English varied substantially from fall 2011 to fall 2015. In three of the last five years the success rate was at or above the target, however the fall 2015 rate of 69.74% did not achieve the 2016 target.

2016 Target: Expected = 75.0-76.0%

This target was corrected when the refocused IEMs were adopted in FY2015. The expected target of 75.0-76.0% reflects the average success rates of the corrected 2006 through 2010 data.

Percent of students who successfully completed developmental English in the given fall semester and subsequently successfully completed college-level English before the end of the following fall semester, earning a grade of C or higher. Fall 2015 data represents students who successfully completed developmental English in fall 2015 and went on to successfully complete college-level English by fall 2016.

 

Success in 0-15 Courses measures success rates (C or higher) of students enrolled in the identified 0-15 courses during the given fall semester. These rates are compared to the college-level course average. Success rates for both the 0-15 courses and the overall college-level course average have been consistent over the past five years. In fall 2016, there was a success gap of 6.23% between the college-level average and the 0-15 courses. The 2016 target was not achieved.

2016 Target: Stretch = A percentage equivalent to the overall success rate in college-level courses (currently 73.20%)

The indicator was added to the refocused IEMs in FY2015. The stretch target is aligned with the target set by the 0-15 Strategy Team of the 2010-2015 Strategic Plan.

Success rates (C or higher) for the 0-15 courses in the given fall term. The 0-15 courses are typically 100-level high enrollment courses with success rates below the college-level course average. The 0-15 courses include the following: Accounting 101, Computer Information Systems 101, Economics 211, English 101, History 111, Law Enforcement and Justice Administration 101, Management 111, Math 103, Psychology 101, Sociology 101 and Speech 101.
Harper College Office of Institutional Research