International Halloween, Veterans Day Play

Most of the 20- and 30-somethings in Harper College's "Conversation Café" English-immersion group have never celebrated Halloween. This week, they'll get a taste of it.

 

International Halloween

Most of the 20- and 30-somethings in Harper College's "Conversation Café" English-immersion group have never celebrated Halloween. This week, they'll get a taste of it. The diverse group, a unique College offering that draws primarily from Harper's five-days-a-week intensive English program, will celebrate the weekend holiday with a costumes-and-games party from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, October 28 in Room A242, Building A. "This is always huge for them, because most have never really seen Halloween done like this before," says Alice Roberts, an Associate Professor and the group's advisor. "This is what the club is all about: immersing them in English, and in American culture, in a low-key, casual way." The group meets regularly over cookies, juice and coffee, chatting about a variety of topics - in English only - as its members acclimate to life on an American campus. Most in the Café are recent immigrants who already have attended college and earned degrees in their home country; others are some of the more than 100 international students who come to Harper from around the globe to study every semester.

Media Note: The Halloween party is not open to the public, but photographers are welcome. Contact Erin Brooks, Media Relations Specialist, 847.925.6159, kpohl@harpercollege.edu.

 

Veterans Day Play

More than 200 pairs of boots belonging to Illinois soldiers killed in Afghanistan and Iraq will be on stage as part of Harper College's fall production of Bury the Dead, a play offering perspectives from major U.S. military conflicts dating back to World War I. The production, which opens a day after Veterans Day - on Friday, November 12 - tells the story of six dead soldiers who rise up from the grave, requesting not to be buried and asking to be allowed to rejoin the living. "This play boldly asks us to consider the worth of each of these young lives and the impact their loss had on those left behind," Director Laura Pulio-Colbert says. "I hope that we, as an audience, can rise above our political views to consider the cost that comes as a result of war." In addition to the onstage boots - from the American Friends Service Committee's acclaimed Eyes Wide Open exhibition - Harper's updated staging of the 1936 play will include music and projected images from the six major U.S. conflicts of the last century. Vietnam veteran Curt Renz of Arlington Heights - who lost a high school friend, college roommate and childhood buddy in that war - will be among the actors. The boots on Harper's stage will include those of Christopher J. Boyd of Palatine, Kevin Grieco of Bartlett, William Newgard of Arlington Heights, Adriana Salem of Elk Grove Village and William Chaney and Jakub Kowalik of Schaumburg. Harper's Bury the Dead production will be performed at 8 p.m. Friday, November 12 and November 19; 8 p.m. Saturday, November 13 and November 20; and 2 p.m. Sunday, November 14 and November 21. Tickets are $15 for general admission, with discounts for seniors. For tickets, call 847.925.6100, or visit www.harpercollege.edu/boxoffice.

Press Contact: Terry Karow, Marketing and Public Relations Specialist, 847.925.6627, kpohl@harpercollege.edu.


Movie in Sign Language

A new movie done entirely in American Sign Language, and completely without sound, will help highlight Harper College's 18th annual DeaFest - a two-day event geared toward members of the local deaf community. Harper will screen the ASL film "Black Sand," about a group of young adults trying to solve the mystery of whether a creature is stalking vacationers in the Costa Rican jungle, at 8 p.m. Saturday, November 6 in the Wojcik Conference Center amphitheater on the main campus, 1200 W. Algonquin Road in Palatine. The movie has English subtitles. Tickets are $11, and can be purchased through Harper's box office, 847.925.6100 or www.harpercollege.edu/boxoffice. Harper, whose Kimball Hill Family Deaf Institute draws students from across the world, long has been a screening ground for new ASL films. The 2010 DeaFest also will include the annual High School Academic Bowl competition for deaf and hard of hearing high school students (free, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, November 5 in the Wojcik Conference Center amphitheater); a presentation on the successes and challenges of deaf people in developing nations, from Professor Lindsay Dunn of Gallaudet University's Department of ASL and Deaf Studies (free, 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, November 5 in Room E106, Building E); and the Deafnation Expo, a touring trade show offering exhibits and entertainment for, by and about deaf people (free, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, November 6 in the Building M gym). About 5,000 people attend the expo annually. "By providing educational and entertainment events, DeaFest effectively promotes deaf culture and pride," says Debby Sampson, an instructional specialist in Harper's Access and Disability Services Department. The public is welcome at all events.

Media Note: Students and staff from Harper's Kimball Hill Family Deaf Institute are available for advance interviews about DeaFest, its activities and its importance. Contact Erin Brooks, Media Relations Specialist, at 847.925.6159 or kpohl@harpercollege.edu.


Voice from Sudan

In January, South Sudan will vote on whether to secede from Sudan - a historical move that would help achieve freedom after decades of war. Anxiously awaiting the decision is Kenneth Elisapana - a Sudan native, philanthropist from South Sudan Voices of Hope and leader in Illinois' Sudanese Community Center. His firsthand accounts of Sudan's political, economic and social turmoil will be offered in a free lecture as part of Harper College's annual International Education Week, kicking off across campus on Monday, November 1. The annual four-day event, tied to a national celebration backed by the U.S. Departments of State and Education, is packed with a variety of approaches to cultural diversity. The program includes lighthearted fare - from Peruvian dances to an Indian-Pakistani bazaar - but also will tackle more serious, in-the-news topics, including lectures on the AIDS epidemic and women's empowerment in Africa (1 p.m. Monday, November 2, Room A242, Building A), a first-person testimonial on Tibetan education and the founding of a girls' school in that Asian country (11 a.m. Wednesday, November 3, Room A242, Building A), and lessons on peace from the South African struggle (4 p.m. Monday November 1, Room A242, Building A). Elisapana's insider perspective of the genesis of a new nation-state - scheduled for 11 a.m. Thursday, November 3 in Room A242 of Building A - is among the highlights. The College's International Education Week runs from Monday, November 1 through Thursday, November 4. This year's "Making a Difference Globally" theme stemmed from the numerous local non-governmental organizations that exist in Harper's district, said Eric Bohman, a member of the International Studies Committee that coordinated the events. "We're trying to spotlight those to give an idea of how education and international events are linked right at our doorstep," Bohman said. "People in our community can have a far-reaching impact internationally, without even leaving this area." Many of the speakers will come together for a student-run "Hunger Banquet" (noon on Thursday, November 4, Room A236, Building A) - a meal that serves some participants a full feast and others hardly any food at all to shed light on global food balance and spark a discussion on the inequality of basic needs. All events are free. For a full list of Harper's 2010 International Education Week activities, visit www.harpercollege.edu or call 847.925.6750.

International Education Week Photo Opportunities:

Women Empowerment in Africa with Princess Zindie Nvirenda, 1 to 2 p.m. Monday, November 1, Room A242, Building A. The Princess, who now lives in Palatine, will discuss how she has helped African women - and how Harper students and the community can help.

Indian-Pakistani Student Association Bazaar, Noon to 1 p.m. Tuesday, November 2, Room A236, Building A. An annual, colorful display of traditional food, dancing and music.

 

The Art of Henna, 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, November 2, Room A243, Building A. A henna workshop that also will include an overview of the art's history.

 

Peruvian Dance Performance with the Peruvian Folkdance Center, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, November 3 at Harper's Northeast Center, 1375 S. Wolf Road, Prospect Heights.

 

Afro-Caribbean Groove GuitarPerformance, Noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, November 3, Room A236, Building A. The concert features the music of guitarist Peter Aglinskas.

 

Hunger Banquet with Phi Theta Kappa, Noon to 1 p.m. Thursday, November 4, Room A236, Building A. The meal will serve some participants a full feast and others hardly any food at all in representation of the inequities of basic needs worldwide. Speakers from the week will attend.

 

Understanding Sudanese Political, Economic, Social and Religious Background, 11 a.m. to noon Thursday, November 4, Room A242, Building A. Featuring Kenneth Elisapana, a South Sudan Voices of Hope philanthropist and a leader with Illinois' Sudanese Community Center.

Press Contact: Melanie Krakauer, Communications Assistant, 847.925.6000, ext. 2561, kpohl@harpercollege.edu.

 

High School Health Careers Trek

Harper College this week will open its doors to more than 200 area high school students interested in exploring potential healthcare careers. The 2010 High School Career Trek will run from 9:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Friday, October 29; students will tour the College's state-of-the-art health careers labs and participate in hands-on activities offering an up-close look at prospective career fields. The tours will include a walk-through of Harper's new Simulation Hospital - a lab giving nursing students and others the chance to practice their skills in a realistic environment - and will showcase 11 specific Harper health career areas, including dental hygiene, phlebotomy, radiologic technology, cardiac technology and nursing. The students also will view an actual nursing simulation and a sonography demonstration and observe x-rays being read. "This experience is designed to paint a thorough picture of all that Harper offers, and all the opportunities available in the healthcare industry, even in a downturned economy," Associate Dean of Health Careers Barbara Small says. "We also hope it will give participants a real feel for whether healthcare is something they'd like to pursue in the future."

Media Note: This event is not open to the public, but photographers are welcome.

Press Contact: Erin Brooks, Media Relations Specialist, 847.925.6159, kpohl@harpercollege.edu.

 

Horror Classics

Steven Warren Hill has written the book on horror films. Two books, actually. This month, Hill - who authored a set of compilations that collectively study Hollywood horror films produced between 1920 and 1951 - will share his expertise at a free pre-Halloween presentation at Harper College. Hill, also a Harper alumnus, will offer an up-close, inside look at some of the classics, including Bela Lugosi's famous turn as Dracula,at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, October 28 in the Student Center, on the main floor of Building A. His lecture will take up topics like the making of Dracula - which involved Lugosi lobbying for the title role, scenes being lifted from another Universal silent film and cobbled together with sound later, and audience members fainting in shock at the horror they saw onscreen when it opened in 1931. Dracula eventually proved a box office phenomenon, clearing the way for other horror releases, including Frankenstein (1931), The Mummy (1932), The Invisible Man (1933) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935). Hill's books cover those films and dozens more, outlining plot summaries, best scenes and dialogue, mistakes, historical contexts and behind-the-scenes scoops. For more on Hill's Harper appearance, call 847.925.6100 or visit www.harpercollege.edu.

Press Contact: Terry Karow, Marketing and Public Relations Specialist, 847.925.6627, kpohl@harpercollege.edu.


Photo Opportunities

Event: Halloween Party for Harper's Conversation Café English-immersion group. The students, representing countries across the globe, will dress up in costume and enjoy food and games.

Date: 3:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, October 28

Location: Room A242, Building A

Press Contact: Erin Brooks, Media Relations Specialist, 847.925.6159, kpohl@harpercollege.edu

 

Event: High School Healthcare Career Trek

Date: 9:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Friday, October 29

Location: Avanté Center (Call for best times and specific locations)

Press Contact: Erin Brooks, Media Relations Specialist, 847.925.6159, kpohl@harpercollege.edu

 

Event: Distinguished Alumni Award Reception

Date: 6 to 8 p.m. Monday, November 1

Location: Wojcik Conference Center

Press Contact: Erin Brooks, Media Relations Specialist, 847.925.6159, kpohl@harpercollege.edu

 

Event: High School Academic Bowl for deaf and hard of hearing students

Date: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, November 5

Location: Wojcik Conference Center amphitheater

Press Contact: Erin Brooks, Media Relations Specialist, 847.925.6159, kpohl@harpercollege.edu

 

Event: Deafnation Expo touring trade show for, by and about deaf people

Date: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, November 6

Location: Building M gym, lower level of Building M

Press Contact: Erin Brooks, Media Relations Specialist, 847.925.6159, kpohl@harpercollege.edu